Monthly Archives: October 2018

Familiarize These Basic Photography Tips

Basic Photography Tip # 1, Visual literacy

Now that so many of us are just clicking away with whatever technological piece of equipment we have, we are seldom giving thought to how and why the image is important, or in what way it might influence others.

Visual literacy is about seeing instead of looking. When getting ready to take that shot, stop for a second to think about what the picture is saying.

Understand that every photograph suggest its own vision and view of the world. When you are getting ready to take that shot, try to pre visualize what is being translated from the three-dimensional reality that is in front of you, onto the two- dimensional space within the frame of the photograph. The camera is only a tool which will help you present your interpretation of what you see to the world.

Basic Photography Tip #2, Visual impact and Appeal

There are many formal values within a photograph, and they may vary. These values consist of composition, proportion, focus, balance, rhythm, and texture among others. Any of these elements will influence the visual impact and appeal of the photograph. But, the most important basic photography tip is the value of composition, or in other words, the satisfying arrangement of shapes and the space they occupy.

Basic Photography Tip #3, Importance of Composition

Determine who or what the subject is. Decide what might be the best camera position, or point of view. Instead of holding your camera at eye level, try a different angle or point of view. Get down lower or get higher when composing the shot.

Think about whether the subject and the surroundings compatible. Look around, make sure don’t see any things such as lamp posts or trees coming out of the back of someone’s head.

Always Check the Frame

Think about how you will frame the photograph. Select the scene by looking through the viewfinder or digital back. Observe the scene from edge to edge of the frame. Take notice what of what might be left out of the frame to make a better composition. Work on filling the frame with only the necessary elements, instead of depending of cropping later.

The Rule of Thirds in Photography

The rule of thirds and subject placement in one of those, must know, basic photography tips, that you want to keep in the back of your mind. After using it for a while, you will instinctively know when the shot feels right.

Most good photographs have a main subject or event. Think about it, when you are aiming your camera, there is a certain subject or event that you are trying to photograph. Where you place that subject in the frame determines the effectiveness and emphasis of the picture. The rule of thirds is a compositional method which suggest that the points of interest should be positioned at the intersection of two sets of vertical and horizontal lines that divide the image into thirds. Place what is important at one of the four intersecting points for geometric balance in your image.

In conclusion, the most important basic photography tip that will make all the difference, is to find yourself and develop your own style.

It is O.K. to emulate others, sometimes, but don’t try to imitate others. One way to make sure this doesn’t happen is to try producing a series of images that deal with a particular subject matter. Make sure the subject is of interest to you, other wise you will get bored and give up on the project. This intentional way of shooting photography will help develop your skill and abilities faster and will learn to visualize your ideals sooner than if you rely on what happens when you are randomly shooting.

Practicing these basic photography tips will help you to gradually stand out from the crowd of snap shooters while also finding your self and developing your own style.

Fashion Photography Tips

We see them all over the place; in television advertisements, in magazines, and on the runway. They are the beautiful men and women who strut their stuff while showing off the latest styles from the hottest fashion designers. These are the fashion models of today and tomorrow, and the subject of high fashion photography. It is through photography that these models and fashionable clothing are brought to the public. Therefore, these photographs must be taken with a certain level of precision and a special attention to color, style, and lighting composition. Learning a few key fashion photography tips will help to make this possible.

High fashion photographers such as Mario Testino and Eva Mueller may not be as famous as the models they shoot, but they are actually sought out more than their model counterparts by fashion magazines and designers. While the dream of huge paychecks and hobnobbing with the rich and famous might appeal to the aspiring fashion photographer, it is not easy to become successful in fashion and model photography. For every one talented young photographer who makes it big, there are hundreds are left dreaming about the moment their photo will be chosen.

Here are a few fashion photography tips for anyone interested in getting started in the field of fashion photography. The first thing you must do is study your subject. As with any field, you can never learn enough. Read as many fashion magazines you can possibly get your hands on. There are a number of fantastic books on the subjects of fashion and model photography available. They can be purchased cheaply online at sites like Amazon.com or even cheaper if you get them used on eBay. You will also need a good camera, a tripod, and a lighting system. One of the more often overlooked fashion photography tips, is to ensure that you always have plenty of film and extra batteries available.

One of the most important fashion photography tips to focus on is having a portfolio. You need to start assembling a portfolio of your work and you need to keep this portfolio handy at all times. You never know when you will have the opportunity to show your work off to someone in the fashion world. Sharp, vibrant images on a 4 x 5″ transparency will best show off your work, so focus on them when putting your fashion photography portfolio together. If any of your work has already been published regardless of whether it was a local magazine, newspaper or contest, add a tear sheet (literally a sheet you torn out of the magazine) is a great addition to a portfolio. You should have a minimum of 20 photographs in your portfolio and showcasing different styles.

In this day of the internet, it is wise to display your fashion photography talent online as well. Setup a simple website displaying your work and submit your digital photos to online contests. Also, submit them to online fashion gallery websites. This will help tremendously with getting your work seen and showcasing your talent around the world. Probably the most important of all the fashion photography tips is to get your photographs seen by as many people as possible. There is no better way of doing this than by putting them online.

Remember that most fashion magazine editors are looking for your personality in the photographs that you take. Each fashion photographer will captures the essence of a fashion design and model differently. Most importantly, if this is your dream, do not give up, ever! Keep learning the latest high fashion photography tips and keep working to get your photographs on the cover of my next hot fashion magazine.

Make Your Wedding Budget

Your wedding is perhaps the biggest celebration you will be a part of. And why not, it is a celebration of a new beginning and new life. To make your wedding the most it can be, here are a few tips that will stretch your budget.

Stick To The Budget

A vendor such as a photographer may offer to give you a special package deal if you add more options. Make sure and think about if it is going to cost you more and if it is really necessary. Weigh your options on what is most important in your budget and don’t change your limit on the less important items.

Compare Vendors

Find out what other vendors are offering for prices. Consider this when talking to vendors and make sure and ask what other costs there will be after everything is said and done. Make sure and compare apples to apples. For instance you may be talking to a videographer that merely gives you the footage of your wedding and charges $750 and another vendor that edits the footage in a more cinematic fashion that charges $2,400. Both are totally different, on both prices may be consistent with what the vendor services are.

Book Early – Book Intelligently

Often times vendors get slammed in the popular wedding seasons. In colder places the summers are more popular, and in the not so cold places the spring time is more popular. By booking well in advance you will get vendors who aren’t as much in demand and may offer more reasonable prices. Book late and they may give you an outrageous price because they know they have nothing to loose. Also consider having your wedding on a Friday or even on a weekday if possible. Wedding places and vendors oftentimes have a discount on days outside of the weekend.

Use Your Friends And Family

Your friends and family may have vendors they recommend. Also you can go to the web to see portfolios or pictures of what you are looking for. If you have a particularly crafty friend, why not put them in charge of decorations. If you have a family member that is baker, put them in charge of the wedding cake. Even if they aren’t the one making it, they will know the market better and will have a better chance of getting a good deal. Often times family and friends are anxious to help if you only ask.

At the end of the day your wedding is your more most joyful union. You will want to do everything you can to make it such. Oftentimes the planning process and budgeting can be overwhelming. Make sure and give yourself plenty of time to plan for your wedding. Be smart about how you spend your money but also remember that you get what you pay for. Vendors are there to facilitate you and not vice versa. Find the vendors that fit your style and personality.

Tips Your Wedding Photographer

Getting married soon? Congratulations! As wedding season approaches, us wedding photographers have one eye at all times on the weather – and another on the constantly shifting requirements of our clients. It’s with this in mind that I thought that this week, I’d put together some hints and tips for how to plan your perfect photography on the wedding day.

1. Be realistic about the photography which is achievable at your venue.

To start with a bit of a dampener – take a good hard look at your venue, your surrounding location and your timings. If you’ve been browsing wedding photographer websites, particularly those set in the beautiful South West locations of Somerset and Devon, you’ll no doubt have been beguiled by gorgeous shots of couples drifting through stunning yellow rapeseed fields, looking out to sea over dramatic cliffs, or dappled in sunshine with evening sunbeams drifting through woods. All these shots, and more, are undeniably beautiful. However, let’s face it, unless you’re getting married next to a wood, a cliff or a rapeseed field, you’re not going to have the time on your wedding day to go out and get these shots – or, indeed, wait until the evening sun is just right and abandon your guests halfway through the wedding breakfast to take advantage of ‘golden hour’.

Realistically, the vast majority of these type of shots are not taken on the wedding day, but on post-wedding ‘love the dress’ shoots, where you have all the time in the world to travel to the perfect location, wait for the light to be just right, and relax without worrying about your guests or holding up the wedding breakfast. Most couples on their wedding day have around half an hour for their ‘couples shots’, if not less – so bear this in mind and work with your photographer to find the right backdrops at your venue where you can get gorgeous wedding day shots without putting undue pressure on your timings. If you do want the stormy clifftop scenes or woodland idylls, however, just ask – most wedding photographers will offer post-wedding shoots, and even better, you get to wear your dress all over again!

2. Lineups, lineups – love them or hate them, how to do them.

Nearly all of my wedding photography work is carried out in reportage, or candid style; it suits my client’s needs and wishes and provides a more truthful, honest record of the wedding day, allowing me to work much more unobtrusively. However, nearly every client of mine specifies that they also need some lineup shots – generally for the mums and dads, who want these for the mantelpiece. If not managed properly, lineups can take far too long and keep your guests away from the celebrations – something which neither the photographer nor the guests want! So, here’s a few tips on how to keep your lineups quick, effective and relatively painless.

– Make a list of the lineups you want before the day and talk these through with your photographer. You might find that you actually don’t need as many as you think, and an organised approach will save time on the day.

– Make sure your Master of Ceremonies, best man or other key wedding party member has a copy of the lineups and helps with getting the right people into shot. Many hands make light work! – Look at potential locations for your lineups prior to the wedding day, taking into account the size of the groups and where the light will be at the time you’ll be doing this on the day. Always have a ‘Plan B’ in the eventuality of bad weather.

– Remember that it’s easiest to get these lineups done whilst you’ve got all your guests together – so do the large groups first, allowing people who aren’t required for smaller, immediate family & wedding party shots to return to the party and not be left hanging around.

3. Trends quickly turn into gimmicks – so beware

No doubt you’ll book your wedding photographer based, at least in part, on the style of the photography you’ve seen on their website. As with most things, photography (and in particular, wedding photography) can go through trends – in composition, in style and in processing. As a wedding photographer, I spent a lot of time discussing the look and feel of my client’s photographs prior to the wedding day, with the ultimate aim being to reflect the couple’s own style and personality.

However, one of the things I always advise clients is not to plump for any photographic or processing style which is too quirky. For example, retro styling and processing is great – but let’s do it with a feather touch, not an iron fist. You’ll be looking at your photographs for many years to come, and the last thing you want is to fall out of love with the shots you loved so much at the time, just because the processing style is no longer in vogue.

So, if you have a defined ‘look’ which you’d like for your photography, think carefully about how it might look in five years’ time – and if in doubt, err towards a more classic look, or a photographic or processing style which has been around for a long time. For example, cinematic style processing which replicates the look of some of the great slide and 35mm film brands STILL looks great, many decades after it was first used on the big screen.